Hearing Loss

Good hearing contributes to your health and happiness in so many ways. If you–or others–have noticed changes in your hearing, you may have some questions about hearing loss and today's hearing aids. Having the right information at hand will help you understand how common hearing loss is, and how easy and “invisible” it can be to treat.

If you experience these warning signs repeatedly, or in combination, they may indicate a hearing loss.

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Have questions about hearing loss or hearing aids? Get your answers here.

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If you have hearing loss, you are not alone. Over 95% of hearing losses can be helped with hearing aids.

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Learn more about the three main types of hearing loss—conductive, sensorineural and mixed.

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A hearing “test” actually includes several tests that measure how well you hear a variety of sounds, such as tones and speech.

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Wearing a hearing aid in each ear helps you hear sounds just as nature intended.

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Hearing loss affects approximately 34 million Americans, or 11% of the population! While its impact is felt mainly by senior citizens, hearing loss is increasing among baby boomers and young people alike.

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If you are the spouse, child, or friend of someone with untreated hearing loss, you may think you're helping them by repeating yourself. But, you could be making their hearing loss worse.

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Tinnitus can develop gradually or appear out of nowhere – and its causes are varied and difficult to pin down. It has no cure, but can be managed through a few simple steps.

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There are over 200 pharmaceuticals known to adversely affect the human auditory system, and they can cause temporary or permanent hearing loss. These drugs are called “ototoxic.”

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A hearing loss support group can take a variety of forms, including in-person group meetings, and internet forums and chats.

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Measured in degrees, hearing loss is divided into levels that are based upon a person's auditory thresholds. Trained and licensed hearing care professionals can tell you whether your hearing loss falls into the severe-to-profound category.

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According to several major studies, older adults with hearing loss are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and dementia, compared to those with normal hearing.

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Hearing loss is caused by many factors, including advancing age, our genetics, trauma (one event or over time), fetal development, and infection. When due to infection, one of the most common culprits is bacterial meningitis.

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Hearing loss is getting more and more common among all age groups. Over the years, Better Hearing Month has successfully convinced many people to get their hearing checked.

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Even if you have a little hearing loss, check out these tips preserve your good hearing for the rest of your life.

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Even moderately high volume can cause hearing loss if listened to for too long. For example, listening to sound at ninety decibels for three hours can be as damaging as hearing something at 155 decibels (like a jet taking off) for thirty seconds.

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